The horizontal mastopexy goes by many names, including the “Horndesky Method” and “Ultimate Lift.” This technique enables surgeons to create a new position for the nipple without leaving a vertical scar from the areola to the breast crease. Instead, a horizontal incision is made across the entire breast above the areola, and the surgeon excises the skin below it while preserving the nipple.
Aging brings on a general redistribution of body fat, especially around the middle. For women, childbirth can leave behind a roll of stubborn and unsightly belly fat. And, of course, genetics count for a lot, too. But when it comes to liposuction, not all fat is created equal. Fat that’s resistant to diet and exercise is usually subcutaneous fat, which lies beneath the skin and on top of the abdominal muscle wall. The good news is that’s what liposuction is intended to remove. Liposuction can remove pockets of flab, recontour your middle and improve your shape.
You may notice an improved body contour immediately (for instance, if you have your saddlebags suctioned), but your results will be disguised initially by swelling. Swelling should improve dramatically after six weeks and continue to go down over the next six months. If you think you’ll need more lipo to get the result you want, wait at least six months for the swelling to subside, then evaluate the situation with your surgeon. Just keep in mind that you’ll continue healing and seeing better results for up to a year.
Gaining in popularity is something called the vertical lift, which involves a scar around the areola and then straight down the breast, eliminating the underneath scar. Proponents think that the shape is good, that the breast maintains a lot of projection over time without bottoming out, and that the underneath scar is avoided. I believe that many of these breasts look overly projecting to my taste, and that bottoming out can be minimized with the inverted T style pattern. I also feel that the underneath scar is rarely seen, and that the scars that are seen - around the areola and going straight down, seem relatively more visible with this technique since it requires some bunching up of the skin during closure. Understand that some of the best surgeons in the world argue with one another about this issue at meetings all the time!
×