Finally, lifts can be done with a scar just around the areola. A frenchman named Louis Benelli popularized this procedure, as did a Brazilian named Goes. But they do extensive work on the inside to shape the breast, something that few american surgeons actually do. In their hands, terrific results can be achieved, but I have seen inconsistent results with this procedure with american surgeons. Allegedly, it is the operation that has the highest incidence of malpractice suits. This is not due to anything inherently wrong with the procedure, but that the procedure is being used in breasts that are probably too droopy, heavy, and loose for this technique. I have achieved excellent results with this, but only on breast that are relatively small and light, and that don't have a lot of droopiness.
It’s a popular method because the incision enables doctors to reshape breast tissue and insert implants either above or below the muscle, leaving only a small scar along the top of the areola. However, it also has its downsides: only a minimal amount of lift can be achieved, not all sizes and types of implants will fit, and the majority of women desire a bigger boost than this method can deliver.
You may notice an improved body contour immediately (for instance, if you have your saddlebags suctioned), but your results will be disguised initially by swelling. Swelling should improve dramatically after six weeks and continue to go down over the next six months. If you think you’ll need more lipo to get the result you want, wait at least six months for the swelling to subside, then evaluate the situation with your surgeon. Just keep in mind that you’ll continue healing and seeing better results for up to a year.
Gaining in popularity is something called the vertical lift, which involves a scar around the areola and then straight down the breast, eliminating the underneath scar. Proponents think that the shape is good, that the breast maintains a lot of projection over time without bottoming out, and that the underneath scar is avoided. I believe that many of these breasts look overly projecting to my taste, and that bottoming out can be minimized with the inverted T style pattern. I also feel that the underneath scar is rarely seen, and that the scars that are seen - around the areola and going straight down, seem relatively more visible with this technique since it requires some bunching up of the skin during closure. Understand that some of the best surgeons in the world argue with one another about this issue at meetings all the time!
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