Unfortunately, there are no completely scarless breast lifts.  There are 4 main types of breast lifts performed depending on the amount of sagging, excess skin, surgeon preference, and patient preference.  Each one has a slightly different scar pattern.  The ones with the least amount of scarring also tend to be the least effective in terms of lifting and coning the breasts into a more perky shape.  The moon-shape (crescent) lift involves a scar hidden along the upper half of the areola border.  The donut (circumareolar) lift involves a scar hidden around the entire circumference of the areola border.  These scars camouflage very well where the darkly pigmented skin of the areola meets the lighter skin of the rest of the breast.  These lifts work well when the nipple is only slightly downward pointing.  One of the disadvantages of these lifts is that they can only raise the areola up to a maximum of about 2 cm.  They also tend to flatten the breast shape and are not ideal when there is saggy breast tissue in the lower pole.

While on the subject of minimizing lift scars, many people use breast implants to fill up an empty or slightly droopy breast. Though this is just a semantic way of thinking about it, droopy breasts need to be lifted, and deflated/collapsed breasts may be fixable with an implant. Of course, a woman has to want to have implants and be larger to approach droopiness with an implant. And one of the most common problems I see in women with implants is women who really needed a lift, but instead chose to put in a big implant, making them larger than they wanted to be and stretching and thinning their tissue out more.

Dr. Jugenburg uses advanced wound closure techniques and dissolvable deep sutures to support the repositioned skin and tissue on the breasts and minimize the risk of visible scar stretching. In some patients, permanent Gore-Tex sutures may also be used to provide long-term support. All patients are required to wear a surgical support bra at all times for 6 weeks after surgery, which will lessen tension on the incision lines and prevent scar stretching. Patients are also instructed to sleep on their backs during this time to avoid pressure on the breasts.
Any surgery—medical or cosmetic—that requires cutting the skin is going to leave a scar. The scar’s size will depend on the length of the incision that must be made, which will depend on the procedure being performed. When you have a breast lift (also called a mastopexy), you will be left with vertical scars that extend from the bottom of your areola to the inframammary fold, the area where your breast meets your chest.
A: In general, no plastic surgeon can guarantee that breastfeeding will still be possible after the breast lift surgery. But in most cases, you should be able to breastfeed after a breast lift if the nipple was left intact during the procedure, and was still connected to all the anatomical structures underneath the nipple. However, if you are planning to become pregnant, its recommended that you wait until after your pregnancy to have a breast lift. Reason being, as your breasts enlarge during pregnancy the skin will stretch. Depending on the elasticity of your skin before pregnancy and the degree to which your breasts enlarge during pregnancy, your breast skin may permanently stretch. In this case the results of breast lift surgery performed before pregnancy would be lost.
I would recommend an in-person consultation with a plastic surgeon where a thorough physical examination and measurements will be made to determine the best treatment plan for you.  At the consultation, you should view before-and-after photos of various breast lift techniques in patients with breasts similar to yours to see if you like the results before undergoing surgery.  Best of luck!
Although liposuction is used to get rid of fat, it’s not a weight-loss solution. Liposuction works best on deposits of fat that are concentrated in particular areas and resistant to exercise, particularly around the stomach, thighs, hips and buttocks. You might lose a little weight, but it’s not likely to be significant. Liposuction also won’t fix a bulging stomach that’s caused by weakness in the abdominal wall, and it won't tighten loose skin. For toning and flattening the abdominal area, however, liposuction is sometimes combined with abdominoplasty, also known as a tummy tuck, in which fat is removed from the belly, the muscle wall repaired and excess skin removed.
Despite the increase in research on fat grafting to the butt, many questions remain. For example, there is no exact science behind how much fat to harvest or inject. The fat that is injected must develop its own blood supply to survive — and, on average, just half of it does. This means that 50 percent of the injected fat dissolves. To compensate, some plastic surgeons will over-inject. They don’t always get it right, and repeat treatments are often needed.

Although liposuction is used to get rid of fat, it’s not a weight-loss solution. Liposuction works best on deposits of fat that are concentrated in particular areas and resistant to exercise, particularly around the stomach, thighs, hips and buttocks. You might lose a little weight, but it’s not likely to be significant. Liposuction also won’t fix a bulging stomach that’s caused by weakness in the abdominal wall, and it won't tighten loose skin. For toning and flattening the abdominal area, however, liposuction is sometimes combined with abdominoplasty, also known as a tummy tuck, in which fat is removed from the belly, the muscle wall repaired and excess skin removed.
Each year, thousands of women undergo breast lift procedures to restore the shape and volume of their breasts for a more youthful breast contour. Oftentimes breast lifts are combined with other procedures such as breast augmentation or breast reduction. In cases like these, the breasts are lifted as they are increased or decreased in size. The result are breasts that look and feel better!
The most common procedure is something that involves an "inverted T" or an "anchor" scar,one that goes around the areola, goes straight down, and then underneath. It's a lot of scar. Advocates - and I am one - feel that it gives the best shape, tightens the breast most completely and thoroughly, and because tension is distributed evenly along the length of the scars, that though long, the quality of the scar is likely to be good. Critics think that the benefits of the shape do not justify the length of the scar, and that this technique is prone to something called "bottoming out", which is when the lower part of the breast stretches.
Finally, there’s the so-called scarless lift. Women who are seeking a mild lift but are dead set against leaving scars anywhere on their breasts may opt for a technique that uses a network of dissolving surgical threads inserted through tiny incisions along the collar bone, guided under the breast tissue, and then anchored to the collar bone, to create an internal bra of sorts. Scar tissue forms around the threads, theoretically providing support to lift the nipple.
VASER liposuction, a variation of UAL, evenly disperses the ultrasonic energy with a grooved cannula and probe. The ultrasound energy breaks up the fat and frees it from the surrounding tissue, making fat easier to remove, with less swelling, pain, downtime, or potential for sagging skin than traditional lipo. Dr. George Marosan, a board-certified plastic surgeon in Bellevue, Washington, prefers VASER liposuction in most situations. “Fat comes out more easily with VASER—especially in men, where it’s more fibrous,” Dr. Marosan says. He also points out another great advantage of VASER lipo: While fat that’s liquified by laser lipo isn’t usable, fat broken up by VASER is still viable for transfer to the breasts, butt, or anywhere you want more fullness. “The VASER allows me to sculpt the body, revealing the underlying muscle and bony anatomy. This is an advanced technique that goes way beyond liposuction for fat removal only,” says Dr. Marosan.e
Any surgery—medical or cosmetic—that requires cutting the skin is going to leave a scar. The scar’s size will depend on the length of the incision that must be made, which will depend on the procedure being performed. When you have a breast lift (also called a mastopexy), you will be left with vertical scars that extend from the bottom of your areola to the inframammary fold, the area where your breast meets your chest.
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