Despite the increase in research on fat grafting to the butt, many questions remain. For example, there is no exact science behind how much fat to harvest or inject. The fat that is injected must develop its own blood supply to survive — and, on average, just half of it does. This means that 50 percent of the injected fat dissolves. To compensate, some plastic surgeons will over-inject. They don’t always get it right, and repeat treatments are often needed.
Although the removed fat cells are unlikely to grow back, body fat has been shown to return to preliposuction levels within a year after the surgery, particularly returning to the abdominal area. Researchers believe the body compensates for the rapid fat loss by putting on more fat. In a trial of 34 women published in the September 2012 edition of the journal “Obesity,” the cosmetic benefits of liposuction were lost after one year. A later study, however, suggested that recurrence of belly fat can be avoided by exercise.
That being said, the regulations per US state, if considering to undergo a BBL there, impose different costs on the surgical facility that needs to be charged to patients. However, in densely populated areas with many plastic surgeons, whose surgical facilities are in particularly close proximity, the operating room charges don't vary that much within these areas. Therefore, if the majority of local operating rooms charge $500/hour and a surgeon is charging half that much, it should raise concerns that something is not being done at the facility; something that might compromise the safety of the procedure.
During the course of a woman’s life, the breasts change in appearance and oftentimes sag. Don’t worry, this is NOT an uncommon condition. In fact, the clinical term for female breasts that sag is called ‘breast ptosis.’ There are many causes of breast ptosis including pregnancy, cigarette smoking, high body mass, gravity and the natural aging process. There are also different degrees of ptosis as shown in the illustration below. Fortunately, breast ptosis can easily be treated with breast lift surgery.

Unfortunately, scarring is a reality of any breast lift surgery. The amount of scarring and positioning of the incision, however, can be personalized and tailored to the patient’s condition. Generally, a patient who needs a more pronounced lift may need a full anchor scar, while a patient with milder sagging can get away with a single vertical scar. A board certified plastic surgeon will guide you toward the correct type of breast lift for your condition, but it is important to understand that this scarring is the tradeoff that results from having perkier, more youthful breasts.  


We think you shouldn’t have to wait to look better, and more importantly, feel better about yourself. To help our patients afford liposuction, we offer financing options. When you apply, we’ll take a look at your credit history to determine your qualification and financing amount. Upon approval, you can book a date for your procedure. Afterward, you’ll make monthly payments. Financing can help you get where you want to be sooner rather than later.
The most common procedure is something that involves an "inverted T" or an "anchor" scar,one that goes around the areola, goes straight down, and then underneath. It's a lot of scar. Advocates - and I am one - feel that it gives the best shape, tightens the breast most completely and thoroughly, and because tension is distributed evenly along the length of the scars, that though long, the quality of the scar is likely to be good. Critics think that the benefits of the shape do not justify the length of the scar, and that this technique is prone to something called "bottoming out", which is when the lower part of the breast stretches.
In any case, you can probably find the average costs of all procedures in different cities right here on Realself. Plastic surgery fees vary a lot from surgeon to surgeon, from place to place, and country to country.But beware of choosing a surgeon solely on price. Make sure to do your research and make sure he or she is a board certified plastic surgeon.
Disclaimer: Please note, any information on this page is provided to you for educational and/or informational purposes only, and should not be construed as an endorsement of any particular procedure, product or treatment. This information is also not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment by a doctor or other qualified health care professional. For medical concerns, including decisions about any procedure, product or treatment, visitors should always consult with their doctor or other qualified health care professional.
Following breast lift surgery, patients may experience discomfort, swelling, and bruising, which typically last from two to three weeks. Prescription pain medications may make patients more comfortable during the first week of breast lift recovery. Patients are required to avoid sleeping on their stomachs for the first two weeks, and are advised to take sponge baths until the sutures are removed. Your doctor will make other suggestions to maximize comfort during the recovery period.
You may notice an improved body contour immediately (for instance, if you have your saddlebags suctioned), but your results will be disguised initially by swelling. Swelling should improve dramatically after six weeks and continue to go down over the next six months. If you think you’ll need more lipo to get the result you want, wait at least six months for the swelling to subside, then evaluate the situation with your surgeon. Just keep in mind that you’ll continue healing and seeing better results for up to a year.

Any surgery—medical or cosmetic—that requires cutting the skin is going to leave a scar. The scar’s size will depend on the length of the incision that must be made, which will depend on the procedure being performed. When you have a breast lift (also called a mastopexy), you will be left with vertical scars that extend from the bottom of your areola to the inframammary fold, the area where your breast meets your chest.
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