Finally, there’s the so-called scarless lift. Women who are seeking a mild lift but are dead set against leaving scars anywhere on their breasts may opt for a technique that uses a network of dissolving surgical threads inserted through tiny incisions along the collar bone, guided under the breast tissue, and then anchored to the collar bone, to create an internal bra of sorts. Scar tissue forms around the threads, theoretically providing support to lift the nipple. 

The most common procedure is something that involves an "inverted T" or an "anchor" scar,one that goes around the areola, goes straight down, and then underneath. It's a lot of scar. Advocates - and I am one - feel that it gives the best shape, tightens the breast most completely and thoroughly, and because tension is distributed evenly along the length of the scars, that though long, the quality of the scar is likely to be good. Critics think that the benefits of the shape do not justify the length of the scar, and that this technique is prone to something called "bottoming out", which is when the lower part of the breast stretches. 

Despite the increase in research on fat grafting to the butt, many questions remain. For example, there is no exact science behind how much fat to harvest or inject. The fat that is injected must develop its own blood supply to survive — and, on average, just half of it does. This means that 50 percent of the injected fat dissolves. To compensate, some plastic surgeons will over-inject. They don’t always get it right, and repeat treatments are often needed.
A major key to making sure that the breast lift process is as comfortable as possible is planning ahead of time. Much of the post-operative discomfort is due to swelling. While wearing a compression bra should help manage some of the swelling and help reduce pain, there are other things that can be done to reduce swelling and make your recovery easier.
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