One of the most worrisome aspects of breast lift surgery for most patients is the potential for noticeable scarring. As a procedure designed to improve the aesthetic look of your body, a poorly performed procedure can end up leaving noticeable marks, typically under the breast. Fortunately, advancements in technology during and after the procedure have reduced the risk greatly in terms of the creation of scarring that’s noticeable.
The most common procedure is something that involves an "inverted T" or an "anchor" scar,one that goes around the areola, goes straight down, and then underneath. It's a lot of scar. Advocates - and I am one - feel that it gives the best shape, tightens the breast most completely and thoroughly, and because tension is distributed evenly along the length of the scars, that though long, the quality of the scar is likely to be good. Critics think that the benefits of the shape do not justify the length of the scar, and that this technique is prone to something called "bottoming out", which is when the lower part of the breast stretches.

Any surgery—medical or cosmetic—that requires cutting the skin is going to leave a scar. The scar’s size will depend on the length of the incision that must be made, which will depend on the procedure being performed. When you have a breast lift (also called a mastopexy), you will be left with vertical scars that extend from the bottom of your areola to the inframammary fold, the area where your breast meets your chest.


A major key to making sure that the breast lift process is as comfortable as possible is planning ahead of time. Much of the post-operative discomfort is due to swelling. While wearing a compression bra should help manage some of the swelling and help reduce pain, there are other things that can be done to reduce swelling and make your recovery easier.
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