Some surgeons prefer to give prospective patients an itemized list of all the anticipated costs of liposuction. These separate costs might include the surgical fee (money paid to the surgeon for his services), anesthesiologist’s fee, operating room fee, pre-operative laboratory test fees, charges for post-operative elastic compression garments, and possibly prices for antibiotics and other recommended drugs. Sometimes itemized prices are used when the surgeon cannot control all of the related expenses, such as when the lipo surgery is to be done in a hospital operating room with a hospital anesthesiologist. Itemized lipo prices are also used by surgeons who are in the habit of doing multiple unrelated surgical procedures at the same time that the liposuction is done.
Renato Saltz, MD, is a board certified plastic surgeon with practices in Salt Lake City and Park City, Utah. He is the immediate past president of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery and the second vice president of the International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. Dr. Saltz is a former associate professor of plastic surgery at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, and the past president of the Rocky Mountain Association of Plastic Surgeons. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Plastic Surgery and the American Board of Surgery and a fellow of the American College of Surgeons. Dr. Saltz is also the founder of Image Reborn Foundation of Utah, a non-profit group dedicated to helping women with breast cancer.
Over time, these hidden scars often fade to thin, white lines when complete healing has taken place. Provided that you follow instructions for preparation and recovery, you should have a beautiful result from your breast lift surgery. Upon seeing their final result, women who have undergone breast lifts typically rate the experience as “well worthwhile”
An “Internal” Bra: This is one of the most interesting procedures, as it is a mesh type of bra that is inserted surgically to lift your breasts. The mesh bra provides a little extra structure although over time the mesh is broken down and absorbed by your own tissues. This procedure is called the Breform, and you can expect a surgery of about four hours in the hospital with a few nights in recovery before you are released. The Breform is inserted through a scar in the nipple area or in the crease under the breast.
What you need to do is to see several well-recommended surgeons, and listen to their advice. Don't just go with the one who promises you great results with less scars; make sure that everything they say makes sense. If one person suggests that they can get a great shape with substantially less scar than everyone else, be a little suspicious. It may be true, but it may not. Try going to surgery.org to find a good plastic surgeon. Good luck.

Renato Saltz, MD, is a board certified plastic surgeon with practices in Salt Lake City and Park City, Utah. He is the immediate past president of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery and the second vice president of the International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. Dr. Saltz is a former associate professor of plastic surgery at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, and the past president of the Rocky Mountain Association of Plastic Surgeons. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Plastic Surgery and the American Board of Surgery and a fellow of the American College of Surgeons. Dr. Saltz is also the founder of Image Reborn Foundation of Utah, a non-profit group dedicated to helping women with breast cancer.
Office liposuction under tumescent local anesthesia costs from about 4-7500, and more extensive procedures need to be done in the operating room under general anesthesia. Depending on the time the cost can go up to 15,000. Multiple areas are discounted in the sense that when done in the operating room under general, the additional areas are charged by the total time, not per area, which is a savings.
The most common procedure is something that involves an "inverted T" or an "anchor" scar,one that goes around the areola, goes straight down, and then underneath. It's a lot of scar. Advocates - and I am one - feel that it gives the best shape, tightens the breast most completely and thoroughly, and because tension is distributed evenly along the length of the scars, that though long, the quality of the scar is likely to be good. Critics think that the benefits of the shape do not justify the length of the scar, and that this technique is prone to something called "bottoming out", which is when the lower part of the breast stretches.
Thankfully, there’s a slew of solutions that have been proven to help with scarring, even completely removing the visual effect. One of the first solutions that may be offered is a steroid injection into the area, which helps with the discomfort and redness of scarring. Cortisone creams are another option that may help to reduce the size of the blemish. Targeted cryotherapy, similar to the type of therapy used to remove warts, may also reduce scarring by freezing the tissue away.
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